Sun Dragon Martial Arts and Self Defense, NFP
Policies and conduct

Sun Dragon Policies
Vaccination Policy
Harassment Policy

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Conduct Complaint to the Executive Director

Sun Dragon Vaccination Policy

As an entity, Sun Dragon prioritizes a welcoming and healthy environment for all of our community members. Maintaining adequate immunization rates is critical to preventing disease outbreaks and ensuring the health of all Sun Dragon Participants.

COVID Vaccination Policy (effective Feb 28, 2022)

Per CDC guidelines, Sun Dragon staff is fully vaccinated against COVID-19. To enter the dojo space, you must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19. 

No exemptions to this policy will be approved.

COVID Close Contact Guidelines

For Sun Dragon purposes, exposure is being in close proximity with an infected person in a poorly ventilated space for 15 minutes. Living with family members who are infected, eating lunch with someone who is infected, talking face-to-face with an infected person for fifteen minutes, are all examples of close exposure.  

Because of the way we have the dojo ventilation set up, because of our masking and high vaccination rate, and because we are socially distancing and not partnering with other students, we do not consider being in the dojo at the same time as someone who later tests positive as close exposure.  Here are some guidelines in terms of attending class after you've been exposed to Covid:

  • Please let us know as soon as possible if you've tested positive and you've been in classes at the dojo.  We want to make sure we keep all of our families aware of what's going on.
  • We will always let the affected students know if a person who was in their class later tests positive and you are always welcome to be more cautious than our guidelines stipulate. 
  • If you are exposed and you are asymptomatic, please stay away from the dojo for five days, counting the day of exposure as Day 0.  After five days, if you remain asymptomatic, please rejoin us.  Getting a Covid test after five days would be an extra level of safety, if you have access to tests.
  • If you have symptoms and test positive, the count starts over. Please get tested as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms. The day of the test is DayO--please stay away from the dojo for at least five days after your test and until you are no longer symptomatic and have a negative test. If you don't have access to testing, please stay away from the dojo for an additional two days after the five days and you are no longer symptomatic.

These guidelines are not perfect and we depend on you being cautious and conscientious in order to keep your fellow students as safe as possible.  This is the reason we have the Zoom classes as options--you are welcome to train in Zoom, even if you've tested positive, as long as you're not feeling symptomatic and it would be bad for your health.  And, of course, you can watch class on Zoom, even if you don't feel up to participating.

Health Safety Policy (all other non-Covid vaccinations)

Entering students will not be allowed to register for classes, even during trial sessions, until attesting that the Participant has received immunizations per CDC and AISD guidelines. Participants are required to fill out a Medical Waiver before their trial class and/or workshop, which contains a field to attest your immunization status.

Medical Exemption:

You are strongly encouraged to consult with a physician about the need for immunizations before requesting an exemption. All students must comply with this requirement except those who meet the qualifications for medical exemption.

Before you will be allowed to register for classes without vaccinations, Sun Dragon’s administration must receive a signed affidavit or certificate signed by a physician who is licensed to practice medicine in the United States, which states that, in the physician’s opinion, a particular vaccine would be injurious to your health and well-being.

How often should my child come to class?

We recommend your child come to class twice a week. Because of the skill-building nature of our program, students do best when they have a regular training schedule and maintain consistent attendance.

How can I help my child practice Karate between classes?

By supporting and supervising your child’s independent practice. We very much appreciate parents’ desire to help their children’s training. Even though you may be totally unfamiliar with the skills your child is learning in karate, there are a number of things you can do, including:

  • Being an “audience” for your child performing material they have learned.
  • Helping your child study the Japanese terms. (A study guide is available in the dojo.)
  • Supervising any practice of Karate that your child does at home.
  • Making sure your child does not engage in any Karate activities involving physical contact with another person when they are not in the dojo.
  • You don’t need to correct your child or give feedback—that’s what we do in class, and we applaud any child’s efforts to practice at home. Any practice is good practice!

What should I do if my child appears discouraged or bored with Karate?

Please encourage your child to talk to us about it! As teachers with decades of martial arts training experience, we know that everyone experiences training lags. If your child experiences difficulties with Karate and/or complains about it, we would like to talk to her or him about it as soon as possible. Often we can help them sort out some of the issues that interfere with happy training.

Should my child train if he/she is injured or sick?

Please consult with us, and follow the same guidelines you would about sending your child to school. If your child is unable to attend school, they should not train until feeling better. To best maintain everyone’s health, students who may be contagious should not train. If they are recovering from an illness or injury, and your pediatrician has advised returning to physical activities, please talk with us regarding how we might modify your child’s training so that it can be safe.

Is it a good idea for siblings to train together?

It most certainly can be. Siblings can enjoy the shared experience and camaraderie of training together. We also know that all children inevitably learn at different rates, and this goes for the martial arts as well. At some point, children compare themselves to peers and/or siblings. We encourage all students to concentrate on their own training, rather than comparing themselves to others. We would appreciate you reinforcing this message if any competitive issues arise.

It is very important that children not practice contact training (sparring, partner work) at home; and we more even strongly caution against this with siblings.

What if my child is doing well in Karate but having problems at home or school?

Please talk with us about any behavior or academic problems your child is having. We generally present Karate as a reward for good behavior and performance at home and school. When they feel that their parents and Karate teachers are working together, and that continuing to get to do Karate depends upon being helpful and disciplined at home and school, Karate can be an important leverage tool!


How often should my child come to class?

We recommend your child come to class twice a week. Because of the skill-building nature of our program, students do best when they have a regular training schedule and maintain consistent attendance.

How can I help my child practice Karate between classes?

By supporting and supervising your child’s independent practice. We very much appreciate parents’ desire to help their children’s training. Even though you may be totally unfamiliar with the skills your child is learning in karate, there are a number of things you can do, including:

  • Being an “audience” for your child performing material they have learned.
  • Helping your child study the Japanese terms. (A study guide is available in the dojo.)
  • Supervising any practice of Karate that your child does at home.
  • Making sure your child does not engage in any Karate activities involving physical contact with another person when they are not in the dojo.
  • You don’t need to correct your child or give feedback—that’s what we do in class, and we applaud any child’s efforts to practice at home. Any practice is good practice!

What should I do if my child appears discouraged or bored with Karate?

Please encourage your child to talk to us about it! As teachers with decades of martial arts training experience, we know that everyone experiences training lags. If your child experiences difficulties with Karate and/or complains about it, we would like to talk to her or him about it as soon as possible. Often we can help them sort out some of the issues that interfere with happy training.

Should my child train if he/she is injured or sick?

Please consult with us, and follow the same guidelines you would about sending your child to school. If your child is unable to attend school, they should not train until feeling better. To best maintain everyone’s health, students who may be contagious should not train. If they are recovering from an illness or injury, and your pediatrician has advised returning to physical activities, please talk with us regarding how we might modify your child’s training so that it can be safe.

Is it a good idea for siblings to train together?

It most certainly can be. Siblings can enjoy the shared experience and camaraderie of training together. We also know that all children inevitably learn at different rates, and this goes for the martial arts as well. At some point, children compare themselves to peers and/or siblings. We encourage all students to concentrate on their own training, rather than comparing themselves to others. We would appreciate you reinforcing this message if any competitive issues arise.

It is very important that children not practice contact training (sparring, partner work) at home; and we more even strongly caution against this with siblings.

What if my child is doing well in Karate but having problems at home or school?

Please talk with us about any behavior or academic problems your child is having. We generally present Karate as a reward for good behavior and performance at home and school. When they feel that their parents and Karate teachers are working together, and that continuing to get to do Karate depends upon being helpful and disciplined at home and school, Karate can be an important leverage tool!